Clean Energy

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Debunking Four Myths About The Clean Energy Transition

The grid will require a substantial transformation as more renewable sources come online. Some critics argue technological, financial, and institutional barriers will prevent significant decarbonization of the power sector, but four common clean energy myths are easily debunked by facts and real-world experiences showing the feasibility of a low-carbon energy future.

This is Advanced Energy

Advanced Energy Economy’s new encyclopedia of advanced energy technologies surveys more than 50 advanced energy technologies that work to make the grid more reliable, cheap, and clean. This includes “technologies for electricity generation, electricity delivery and management, building efficiency, water efficiency, transportation, and fuel production and delivery.”

Low-Income Solar Policy Guide

This policy toolbox is designed to improve distributed solar PV access for low-income customers. It identifies four principle barriers to low-income participation—cost, physical barriers, housing conditions, and market forces—and identifies dozens of solutions that address these barriers. Examples include on-bill financing, community/shared solar, green banks, and federal best practice networks. The report includes case studies from California, New York, Colorado, D.C., and Massachusetts, which have put these principles and recommendations into successful action.

Clean Jobs America

This data analysis finds that over America’s clean energy sector now employs more than 2.5 million people. The majority of these jobs come from energy efficiency (1.9 million), and a significant portion come from solar (300,000) and wind (77,000). The solar industry in particular has experienced a 20 percent job growth rate for three years in a row, and is estimated to add 220,000 new jobs in coming years due to the Investment Tax Credit’s extension alone.

Sustainable Energy in America Factbook

This factbook provides data-driven insight into a variety of industries that are contributing to the United States’ transition to a low-carbon economy. It provides a ‘birds-eye view’ of the entire U.S. energy sector, then breaks out subsequent chapters to cover energy-related topics in specific economic sectors. It concludes with cross-sectoral themes recent events and conditions in the U.S. and globally.

Mapping the Gap: The Road from Paris

This factsheet outlines the financial options for meeting the COP21 agreement to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius or below, finding that global investment in new renewable electric power generation will need to reach $12.1 trillion in the next 25 years. Assuming “business-as-usual” will bring in $6.9 trillion in renewables investment, this leaves a “gap” of $5.2 trillion that must be additionally invested to reach the 2 degree target.

Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic Technical Potential in the United States: A Detailed Assessment

This study finds the total national technical potential of rooftop solar PV equates to 39 percent of total national electric sector sales, nearly doubling previous estimates. Because the results are estimates of technical potential, they do not consider what would be required to integrate all the potential PV-generated energy into the power system. In practice, the integration of a significant quantity of rooftop PV into the national portfolio of generation capacity would require a flexible grid, supporting infrastructure, and a suite of enabling technologies.

Getting to 100: A Status Report on Rising Commitments Among Corporations and Governments to Reach 100% Renewables

This report provides an update on the companies and governments that have committed to renewable electricity targets, and what is driving their decision to make these ambitious commitments. It assesses and analyzes a suite of policy and technology options to expand corporate and government use of renewable energy.

Factsheet: Capital and Climate

Over the past several years, the world has witnessed an upward trend in climate and clean energy investment. This has helped drive down costs of innovative low-carbon technologies, which has enabled their incredible market growth. In many situations, renewable energy sources, such as wind and utility-scale solar, are now cost-competitive with traditional fossil fuel sources. The following factsheet highlights the most current data on global investment in low-carbon technologies.

Revolution… Now: The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies

This report details the falling costs and growing installations of clean energy. The cost of wind fell by 40 percent between 2008 and 2014, while solar costs fell by 60 percent, and LEDs by almost 90 percent. The price declines drove a great deal of new installations across all technologies.

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